We’ve been filming in Orange County, Los Angeles and all over the world for nearly two decades, and one thing never changes: Our commitment to the little things that make filming at your office or location a smooth and enjoyable experience. Of course, the mission is to always shoot the best footage possible and produce a great film. But one should never overlook the client experience.
When a production company prepares and films at a client’s location, the crew needs to be considerate of not only the client’s time but the space they occupy. Thus, the idea of “leave no trace” comes to mind. “Leave no trace” is a term coined years ago and refers to a set of principles for minimizing or eliminating a person’s impact on the wilderness.

Well, the same can be applied to your office location. Think of the cable television installer or refrigerator repair person that trampled into your home with muddy boots or showed up late. Production companies are subject to the same expectations of caring service.

Much of our filming takes place in private spaces, including corporate offices, homes, businesses and other properties. Our filming begins days before with a phone call to remind the front office staff of our arrival and a quick conversation about logistics, including the area to load in our filming equipment. Days before the filming, we also organize our equipment, test the cameras, check our list of required accessories, and secure our backup equipment so that everything runs smoothly.

We also lock down our filming schedule. For example, if we are filming an interview, 1.5 hours to bring in the gear, light the shot, setup the cameras and audio, dress the background and solve any problems is normally sufficient time.

At the location, a table or chair will most likely need to be repositioned, as well as objects in the background, including pictures, plants or paperwork. Leaving no trace also means returning everything back to where they were originally found.

Safety is the top priority. This includes securing the lighting and stands with sandbags, taping down cables in walkways, and moving obstacles to allow a clear path.

Rolling the cameras on time is key. The talent (interviewee) and the client depend on the crew to complete the filming within the time promised. Staying organized allows everyone involved to do their job and not overlook important elements, such as straightening interviewee’s tie. Keeping on schedule allows the sound recordist to pause filming for a passing fire truck, for example.

Then we wrap. We check the recording and load out the equipment the same, quiet and efficient way we loaded in. One final check of the space to make sure nothing is left behind. One final look to see that we left no trace.